Lawrence Dallaglio predicts English winner for the Amlin Challenge Cup

first_imgHarlequins, winners in 2001 and 2004, meet Bayonne on the opening weekend in Pool 1 while Gloucester travel to Agen and Sale Sharks host the Spanish side, Cetransa El Savador.“Gloucester have made a slow start to the season but they are looking to build some confidence in this competition and are very tough at home,” Dallaglio added.“The biggest thing they have on their side is the wonderful support at Kingsholm. No opponent will enjoy playing in front of the Shed.”Leeds Carnegie head to Romania, where they face Bucharest Oaks, while Exeter Chiefs will make their European debut against French Top 14 high-flyers Montpellier.“It promises to be the best day in Exeter’s club history. Every game they play in Europe will be the most wonderful experience for everyone involved in the club, from the players to the fans,” explained Dallaglio. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Lawrence DallaglioTo watch an interview with Amlin Rugby Ambassador, Lawrence Dallaglio, assessing the English clubs’ prospects in the Amlin Challenge Cup 2010/11 click here.Amlin Rugby Ambassador, Lawrence Dallaglio, the only player to captain a team to both Heineken Cup and Amlin Challenge Cup glory, has tipped England’s clubs to dominate this season’s Amlin Challenge Cup.The Premiership has provided eight of the last 10 winners of the Amlin Challenge Cup – including Dallaglio’s own London Wasps side in 2003 – and the English charge for the 2010/11 campaign will be led by three former winners in Gloucester, Sale Sharks and Harlequins and Dallaglio believes England will wrench the trophy from the holders, Cardiff Blues, this season.“Traditionally, English clubs have done very well in this tournament. When you look at the history of the Amlin Challenge Cup, almost 99 per cent of the teams to have won it are English,” he said.“There have to be reasons for that and it’s down to strength in depth and the way English clubs approach the competition.“You can’t discount Bayonne and Montpellier, but with the likes of Harlequins and Sale involved, I’m fully expecting an English club to reach the final, if not two.“Newcastle are very familiar with this competition and will be happy to start with a home game. They are a force up there in Newcastle and you have a great chance of progressing in Europe if you win your home games.”center_img “It’s great for rugby to have club like that involved. They have made a great start in the Premiership but some of their players will never have dreamed of playing European rugby.“Montpellier are doing well in the Top 14, but they don’t have a tradition of travelling well in Europe and I know from personal experience that Sandy Park is not an easy place to play.”last_img read more

Super final lays down gauntlet – a blog

first_img Try scoring Will Genia led the Reds to their maiden Super Rugby titleUnder the expectant lights of Brisbane’s Suncorp Stadium, Queensland Reds last night claimed their maiden Super 15 title in the most impressive of ways.Facing a Crusaders team vying for their eighth championship victory, the home side produced a resilient yet inspired display to become the first Australian’s to lift the title since 2004.In a match that twisted and turned in typical thriller fashion, the Reds ran out eventual 18-13 winners thanks to some sterling defence and a smattering of individual genius.With line-ups featuring some of the brightest and best names in the competition, elevated expectations of a classic encounter could certainly have been forgiven. Yet pleasingly, these expectations proved to be well placed, if not a little pessimistic.The mercurial Dan Carter was of course one of the main protagonists, notching all 13 points for the visitors including an exquisite individual try to match his composed kicking. His counterpart Quade Cooper produced a mature yet typically stylish performance, whilst teammate Digby Ioane got on the scoreboard after a well-executed move.Yet the moment of the match fell to the Red’s Will Genia. Pinned back in their own twenty two with ten minutes remaining, the scrum half collected the ball and appeared to be drifting across field before a lightening change of pace saw him surge through the Crusaders defence and pick an intelligent line to outpace his chasers and score one of the tries of the season. Indeed on current form it seems difficult to look past either nation for a winner of the Web Ellis trophy. With so many strong teams in the Super 15 such an entertaining final is a mere snippet of what will be on offer come September and, as exciting as it is for the neutral, it should serve as warning as much as a testament. With so much talent on show it was befitting that a moment of genius should decide the encounter, and the Australian Player of the Year certainly ensured the match lived up to it’s billing.And with just under two months until the World Cup begins, such a strong domestic final will have certainly have given other nations a lot to think about.The Australians first Super 15 win in seven years will give confidence to their young and supremely talented Wallabies squad. The likes of Genia and Cooper are now central figures to a team with only six members holding more than 50 caps, each crafting their game around their natural talent to become real and definite threats. James O’ Connor is another Red developing on early promise, whilst “elder statesmen” Matt Giteau, Adam Ashley-Cooper and Drew Mitchell will provide experienced heads amongst the youth.Defeat for the Crusaders will not damage New Zealand’s morale too much, and with an equally strong squad it is hard not to see them challenging come the Autumn. Carter is a given threat, whilst the emergence and evolution of Sonny Bill Williams has been fast and impressive. Richie McCaw will lead a typically strong pack, whilst the likes of Israel Dagg prove they have talented youth to turn to as well. BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA – JULY 09: Reds players sing their team song after winning the 2011 Super Rugby Grand Final match between the Reds and the Crusaders at Suncorp Stadium on July 9, 2011 in Brisbane, Australia. (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Lions 2013 Player Profile: Tom Court

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Wallabies’ woe: Court (second right) celebrates as the final whistle blows against Australia in 2011COURT has been a regular in the Ireland squad since February 2009 and has accumulated 32 caps, but only eight Tests starts. The Australia-born prop converted from shot-putting to rugby in his late teens and was brought through by the Queensland Reds and Manawatu before he moved to Belfast in 2006.He toured with Ireland A immediately after joining Ulster, and won his first full cap in 2009, playing off the bench twice in Ireland’s Grand Slam campaign.Half his Test starts have been against Canada, the USA and Fiji but he has a wealth of experience on the International stage and is a key member of an increasingly successful Ulster side.WHY SELECTEDOn holiday in his home city of Brisbane after Ireland’s tour of the USA and Canada, Court was in the right place at the right time when the Lions needed a prop to sit on the bench for the match against the Melbourne Rebels. He was called up because Mako Vunipola needed to be rested ready for the second Test, with Alex Corbisiero a doubt after picking up a calf injury in the first Test.TEST PROSPECTSAs close to non-existent as you can get. Court can play on both sides of the scrum, which is an advantage, but there are plenty of props ahead of him in the queue for Test selection.GREATEST DAYHe only played for a few minutes as a blood replacement, but Court was still one of the Ireland players who beat Wales in March 2009 to secure a long-awaited Grand Slam for Ireland. Court also came off the bench to help Ireland beat Australia 15-6 during the 2011 World Cup.IF HE WERE A FOODVegemite – some rate this native Australian highly, some beg to differ. MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – JUNE 24: Ian Evans (C) Tom Court (L) and Richie Gray look on during the British and Irish Lions captain’s run at AMMI Park on June 24, 2013 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Pack pals: at Lions training with Ian Evans and Richie GrayFAST FACTSClub UlsterAge 32 (6 November 1980)Born Brisbane, AustraliaDimensions 6ft 3in, 18st 5lbCountry IrelandTest caps 32Test points Five (one try) Lions caps NoneEvery 2013 Lion is profiled in the July edition of Rugby World, with Lions legend Sir Ian McGeechan giving his verdict on each member of the squad. It’s on sale until 1 July.last_img read more

A week in the life of a Sale Sharks academy player, Part One

first_img60 minutes trainingFood: WeetabixToastSalmon FajitasProtein ShakeTomato PastaGlass of MilkThursdayWe have an hour after school and the standard two to three hours of homework before a run through at Friday lunch. Friday night usually consists of a large meal of usually wholemeal pasta with a tomato sauce and chicken – this is usually eaten with my computer on the table, watching footage of our lineout in the Leicester match on my laptop whilst occasionally glancing at the plethora of Snapchat stories as my friends’ nights out are just beginning to start.Sport: School training 60 minutesFood: Weetabix and blueberriesBanana, milk and toastHam sandwichBagel and butterPasta CarbonaraFridaySport: Light run through 30 minutesFood: WeetabixHash browns and toastCheese sandwichBagel and cream cheesePasta, tomato sauce and chickenSaturdayFollowing a late start and my customary Weetabix breakfast, I had a relaxed drive in to Carrington before playing Worcester in a do-or-die match. Fortunately amends were made, and we managed to secure a convincing win against a talented Worcester side. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Sale Sharks SundayOutmuscled, outplayed, outclassed. We’ve just lost to Leicester, and playing against a Tuilagi and an Umaga is little consolation to the grim reality that Academy Finals Day at Allianz Park is looking ever increasingly unlikely. Ten kilos and four England caps lighter than my opposite man, it was a hard day at the office. Yet this is no office, and this isn’t a full-time job. Tomorrow the work starts in every sense of word – I need to get in the gym, start the recovery, and hand in a history essay – all by 11am. Combining the lives of a Premiership rugby academy player and a Sixth Form student taking four A-levels is not glamorous; the match was lost, the body is broken, but the grind must go on in all aspects of work in the morning.Sport: MatchPost-match Food: Roast Chicken, Vegetables, PotatoesMondayIt’s 6am. This Saturday against Worcester is the chance to make amends. The post-match pains are a regular thing, playing against those who are older, bigger, and more experienced, and with the state of my hip flexor as it is, standing up in the morning can be a struggle. Foam rolling will be the only relief. There is the standard pre-school panic as I try and spend my few spare minutes rolling out the hamstrings and getting a few exercises in my hip rehab program out of the way before quickly eating my usual breakfast, a tube of Weetabix.I’m in school for half seven and head straight for the bikes to try and get moving again – we’re cycling as a team to Sri Lanka over the next month to fundraise for our school rugby tour. Our first team coach allows me to miss training after school as is usually the case after a Sunday match, it’s a relief as my body is tired and a training session in this state would only be detrimental.Despite the brief respite, mocks are in two weeks and there’s little time to rest as I catch up with the homework from the weekend, finish the essay and get some revision in. Whilst I would love to make a start on gaining some of the much-needed mass, the body is too tired and the recovery time too short to fit in a heavy lifting session this week. It’s frustrating, knowing that many of my counterparts at rugby schools, AASE schools or even on full-time contracts are able to spend the majority of their days training without the added pressure of four A-Levels, and I could really do with a bulk now the season is coming to an end.Sport: Cycling in gymFood: Weetabix, Banana, BlueberriesHash Browns, ToastChicken Fillet, Potatoes, VegetablesBagel and cream cheeseChicken Breast, Roasted Vegetables, CouscousBanana BreadSchool run: Pozniak attacking for Manchester Grammar (pic by Eugene Pozniak)TuesdayTuesday brings similar challenges, however with a slightly more rejuvenated feel and a lighter spring in my step, I manage to fit in a gym session at lunchtime with the Firsts. Nutrition throughout the week is always tough, as I have to be up early I can’t prepare my meals for the day as would be ideal, but school lunches are usually substantial. The day will usually start with a tube of Weetabix with milk and some fruit; then pick up some toast, hash browns and a banana at break before grabbing some lunch in the school refectory. Then a snack before rugby, a protein shake if I go to the gym, and a large carb-based supper at home with plenty of protein and veg. Food is the biggest expense of my life by far. We’ve had folders full of sheets and hours of talks from Sale Sharks over the years about the benefits and necessity to eating and drinking well. I’d love to say I take it all into account all the time, and the vast majority of my meals are planned and reasonably healthy, but the odd pizza does occasionally slip by on a post-training cheat meal. As a teenager it’s easy (and I maintain necessary) to have a few brief and glorious moments off from training and strict nutrition.Sport: Gym at Lunchtime – back sessionFood: Weetabix, BananaApple, ToastHam and cheese baguette and bananaProtein ShakeChilli con CarneWednesday Today is probably the biggest physical challenge of my week: an hour and a half of school training in the afternoon, before driving myself in rush hour traffic to Carrington for three hours at Sale Sharks before coming home for 9pm. It’s taxing, but the school work is usually light on a Wednesday and I rarely leave work due in on Thursday until the night before.Sport: 90 minutes First Team rugby60 minutes gym at Salecenter_img The week was tough, and the work intense with mock exams around the corner; despite the challenges, all, however, was balanced, and I managed to make it through – topping the tackle count in the match and managing to get four essays written. Whilst the life may be not exactly glamorous, it is the one I’ve chosen and the one I love. Sacrifices have had to be made over the years – I’ve had to quit water polo and playing the piano in order to stay on top of my workload, and whilst I may miss them, holding on to regrets is a futile exercise.To find out more about best practices for grass-roots rugby, check out the Rugby Innovation Summit Charlie Pozniak is a 17 year old currently playing lock for Sale Sharks U18 in the Premiership Academy League. He is in Year 12 and studying four A-Levels at The Manchester Grammar School: Russian, History, Politics, and RS.last_img read more

Budget discussions continue at Executive Council

first_img January 28, 2012 at 4:55 pm How many of the dioceses pay their asking or a portion currently? TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Executive Council January 2012, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel January 29, 2012 at 11:24 am Proverbs 29:18 By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 28, 2012 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Rev. Ann Fontaine says: [Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council continued Jan. 28 to grapple with the missional, organizational and financial realities of developing a budget for the 2013-2015 triennium.The members also grappled with a timeline that calls for council to develop a draft triennial budget to give to the church’s Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance (PB&F) by the close of its Jan. 27-29 meeting here at the Conference Center at the Maritime Institute. This timeline was contrasted with calls by some council members to spend more time envisioning the church’s mission goals, and revising the budget proposals it received the day before.One budget scenario calls for asking dioceses to contribute 19 percent of their income and the other calls for dioceses contributing 15 percent. The larger amount of income is $103.6 million and the 15 percent-asking budget would be reduced by approximately $13.5 million, according to Treasurer Kurt Barnes. The 19 percent scenario could result in staff reductions equivalent to eight full-time staff positions at most and the 15 percent scenario would amount to 36 full-time equivalent staff positions at most, according to the spreadsheets presented.“The way we are currently approaching the budgeting process appears to be de facto restructuring by funding or de-funding parts of the organization. The tail is wagging the dog,” Lelanda Lee, a member of council’s Advocacy and Networking for Mission committee, told her colleagues.Lee made her comments while members were reporting to the entire council during the morning of Jan. 28 about budget discussions held in committees the previous day after the members received the budget scenarios from its Executive Committee.“This was not a strategic exercise but this was a mathematical exercise,” council member Vycke McEwen said later in the morning while council further discussed the budgeting process.Council member Lee Allison Crawford reported that her colleagues at her table felt the church was “just beginning to understand the system we inherited from General Convention 2009 with the last round of cuts.” The reorganized Church Center “has had success” and to change the system again would be wrong, she said.“The structure has to be an authentic reflection of our values and so we really should change ministries with deliberation and care and reflection and not just by sweeping cuts in a spreadsheet,” she said.“Neither iteration – 19 percent asking or 15 percent asking – provides a new vision,” Katie Sherrod said in reporting the reaction of the Governance and Administration for Mission committee. “We need a vision for the future.”While council heard much discussion the previous day about declining mainline denominational membership and financial struggles caused both by those membership declines and the current economy, council member Brian Cole said that his table colleagues questioned the assumed implications of that information.He said they wanted to challenge the rest of the council to consider “if we believe decline is inevitable and ongoing forever, or do we really believe we have good news to share.”Cole also echoed a theme of some council members who questioned what they said was an assumption that reducing the amount of money the denomination asks of its dioceses would actually result in increased spending on mission activities at that and the congregational level.“We really have to decide what is a fair contribution for the work we want to do at the churchwide level and realize we really can’t control what other people do with the money they keep either at the diocese or a parish,” he said.The Executive Committee will meet later in the day Jan. 28 “to respond to recommendations and observations we’ve heard,” Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori told council at the end of that discussion. The committee will discuss the result of that meeting with the whole of council on Jan. 29, she added.“We’re trying to respond to what we are aware is some anxiety around this,” she said, adding that council had wanted to try a new process for crafting the 2013-2015 budget process and that the process began several months later than the process normally does.“That new initiative I think was creative and hopeful, and it has presented us with a reality that is very different than we’ve experienced in the past,” she said. “It’s more chaotic, but I would also remind you that the Genesis story says there’s no creation in the absence of chaos.”Sherrod acknowledged that the new process came out of council’s “desire to not have happen to us what happened in the last triennium with the budget, and there was a lot of attention paid to getting the numbers right.” However, she suggested that “a piece of the work that got neglected perhaps because of the press of time … was relating those numbers to our vision, as we’ve all talked about.”During the 76th meeting of General Convention in the summer of 2009, Program, Budget and Finance drastically changed the 2010-2012 draft budget that council had given it. Council’s draft proposal was based on an income projection of $161,820,613. The version PB&F presented to convention was based on $141,271,984 income. Convention agreed to the latter version, resulting in a triennial budget that was $23 million leaner than in the previous triennium.That budget also reduced the amount of money the church’s 110 dioceses were asked to contribute to the cost of funding the denomination’s work. The amount went from 21 percent of diocesan income in 2010 to 20 percent in 2011 and 19 percent in 2012. In addition, a $100,000 income exemption was raised to $120,000, thus leaving more money with the dioceses.Program, Budget and Finance meets at the Maritime Institute Jan. 30-Feb. 2 to begin its work on the 2013-2015 draft budget. It will eventually develop the triennial budget to propose to General Convention on July 10. The 2013-2015 budget will not be final until General Convention approves it, a vote now scheduled for July 12. The budget will take effect Jan. 1, 2013.The Executive Council carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1)(a). The council is composed of 38 members, 20 of whom (four bishops, four priests or deacons and 12 lay people) are elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by provincial synods for six-year terms, plus the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Program Budget & Finance Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments are closed. Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Executive Council, center_img Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Budget discussions continue at Executive Council Members wish for more time to envision church’s future Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments (2) Lee Downs says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more

Atlanta diocese adds nominee to bishop slate

first_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET House of Bishops [Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Martha N. Macgill, 54, rector of Memorial Episcopal Church in Baltimore, Maryland, has been nominated by petition and added to a slate of five priests already chosen to stand for election as the Diocese of Atlanta’s next bishop.The other candidates, announced on Feb. 13, are:the Rev. George F. Adamik, 58, rector, St. Paul’s Church, Cary, North Carolina (Diocese of North Carolina);the Rev. Michael A. Bird, 44, rector, Christ Church, Bronxville, New York (Diocese of New York);the Very Rev. Samuel G. Candler, 55, dean, Cathedral of St. Philip, Atlanta, Georgia (Diocese of Atlanta);the Rev. Canon James H. Pritchett, 55, canon to the ordinary, Diocese of Western North Carolina; andthe Very Rev. Robert C. Wright, 48, rector, St. Paul’s Church, Atlanta, Georgia (Diocese of Atlanta).The person elected will succeed Bishop J. Neil Alexander, who was elected in 2001. At the time of his election, Alexander was a professor at the University of the South School of Theology and was priest in charge of St. Agnes’ Church in Cowan, Tennessee. Upon his resignation as diocesan bishop he will become professor of liturgics and head the Department for Anglican Studies at Emory University’s Candler School of Theology in Atlanta.All candidates will come to the Diocese of Atlanta for five public gatherings during the week of May 13. The election of the 10th bishop of Atlanta is scheduled for June 2 and the bishop-elect will be ordained Oct. 13, both at the Cathedral of St. Philip.A document introducing the final slate of candidates can be viewed here.Because the election falls within 120 days of the start of the July 4-12 meeting of the Episcopal Church’s General Convention, that body must consent to the bishop-elect’s ordination.The diocese has a website here devoted to the bishop search and transition. Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Barbara Larson says: Bishop Elections, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 By ENS staffPosted Mar 19, 2012 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments (1) March 19, 2012 at 11:05 pm I followed ENS link to the whole story, and was disheartened–though perhaps not surprised–to find that all five candidates on the slate were men. I think it’s absolutely great, and also absolutely necessary for the electors to have the opportunity to vote for a woman. I’m so glad The Rev. Martha N. Macgill of Baltimore is running. Barbara S. Larson, Pasadena, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments are closed. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Atlanta diocese adds nominee to bishop slate Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more

Church of England pupils pen prayers for Queen’s Diamond Jubilee

first_img Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 center_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME [Church of England] Prayers composed by young children at an inner city Church of England primary school are being used up and down the country as part of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee celebrations.Pupils at St Matthew’s CofE Primary, Westminster were asked to create prayers to mark the Diamond Jubilee as part of the Church School’s family contribution to this weekend’s celebrations.The resources are available online here but have also been circulated around the Church of England’s 4,800 primary schools, more than 200 secondaries and many churches.Headteacher Emily Norman said; ‘Our children, who come from a wealth of religious and ethnic backgrounds, relished the opportunity to write prayers in honour of the Queen. They were all able to choose qualities they admire in the Queen and give thanks for who she is. Celebration and thankfulness are very important values to us here at St Matthew’s. I am very proud of what they have produced and how these prayers are now able to be used by others throughout the country.’Mary Hawes the CofE’s National Children’s Adviser said: “The Diamond Jubilee prayers of the children from St Matthew’s have caught people’s imagination. They are being used in schools and churches across the country – and beyond!  I have received a lot feedback about the prayer by a little girl called Miracle (below) – it seems to really go to the heart of the celebrations.”Dear Almighty God and giver of life.We thank you for blessing our Queen with long life.We pray that you continue to strengthen her as only you are able to doso that she may continue to reign with love and compassion.We ask this in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord and Saviour.Amen.More Diamond Jubilee information from the CofE here. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Posted May 29, 2012 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Church of England pupils pen prayers for Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

Prison storytelling project transforms lives, educates the community

first_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA The women inmates entered and exited the correction center’s multipurpose room single file with hands crossed behind their backs for the inside performance of Stories from the Inside Out. Among two women’s prisons and community correction centers, 17,259 women are incarcerated in Arkansas, according to the state Department of Correction. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service — Fayetteville, Arkansas] The words coming from the mouths of the five actors can be difficult to hear. It’s not the profanity, of which there isn’t much; it’s the descriptions of neglect, abuse, abandonment, addiction and loss experienced by 12 incarcerated women that weigh heavily on listeners.It’s words like those used by a woman reflecting on her sister’s suicide: the bloodied wall; the couch left curbside for trash pickup. All that’s left of a life.Or those of the mother who upon exiting a sweat-soaked bed needs to lock herself in the bathroom and find an uncollapsed vein to inject meth into before she can tend to the children hungry for breakfast and desperate for her attention.They are the words of women who, twice a week for four months, worked with storytellers, poets, songwriters and artists to tap into dark crevices, to access the parts of themselves and their childhood memories that house the pain and suffering both endured and committed, and put it all on paper.In mid-November, the actors read the women’s words for some 230 people gathered at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Fayetteville, Arkansas. It was the third time the Northwest Arkansas Prison Story Project staged a performance of “Stories from the Inside Out” at St. Paul’s, which adopted the project in 2012. The day before, on Nov. 14, the actors staged a reading for the 12 women who participated in the project’s third round and for their fellow inmates inside the community correction center.Kathy McGregor, the project’s director, brought the storytelling project to Fayetteville in 2011 from Memphis, Tennessee, where a fellow nurse and storyteller, Elaine Blanchard, started a prison storytelling project in Shelby County.“There’s power in story and a particular power in learning to tell your own story and having it told back to you,” McGregor said.Kathy McGregor, director of the Northwest Arkansas Prison Story Project, presents a certificate to one of 12 storytellers following the inside performance of Stories from the Inside Out on Nov. 14 at the Northwest Arkansas Community Correction Center in Fayetteville. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSOver the four-month period in preparing a show, themes begin to develop out of life-mapping exercises, poetry-writing prompts, songs and other readings. The women’s writing is then edited down to performance length.Mothers and children were discussed a lot, and the women wanted to go deeper, exploring their own and other’s stories, said writing director Katie Nichol. She earned a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Arkansas, came to the storytelling project in July 2012 as a visiting artist and stayed.“Sometimes it can be really hard when you hear stories full of pain,” said Nichol. “And then you can bring in a poem and watch them go from not understanding analyzing it on a college level.”An ‘inside’ performanceThe Northwest Arkansas Community Correction Center housing the participants resembles a convalescent home, the low-rise building sitting at the intersection of Spring Street and College Avenue in downtown Fayetteville, a college town. The 100 women living there, 97 percent of them white, all are serving time after being convicted of nonviolent crimes. Most, if not all, have one thing in common: emotional, physical or sexual abuse, or a combination of abuses and neglect.“They come up real hard,” said McGregor. “Every city has a way of coming up hard, but Arkansas has rural hard.”Before the center performance began, the actors ran through their lines in a small room off the side of the multipurpose room where the inmates later gathered. The 12 woman whose stories were being told practiced the song “Broken” with musician Shannon Wurst.“I’m stronger than I thought I was,” said “Zaria Ezra” (each of the women receives a “stage name” for confidentiality), 25, serving her ninth month on a probation violation related to previous drug charges. “I’ve gone through a lot.”The child of divorced parents, Zaria Ezra said she had survived abandonment, a 19-year-old boyfriend’s deadly drug overdose and a self-sabotaging approach to relationships with men after his death. “I’d get rid of them before they’d get rid of me,” she said during an interview in the practice room.Zaria Ezra hopes to transition out of the center before Christmas. She plans to return to her family in Bentonville, the headquarters of Walmart, begin rebuilding relationships and work as a cosmetologist while undergoing chemotherapy to treat the Hepatitis C she contracted through intravenous drug use.The prison stories project, she said, helped her free herself from the “mental bondage” associated with hiding herself from others.“I’m not hiding now, I’m telling everyone my story,” she said. “It’s helped me be more confident in myself. I don’t have to hide.”Before the performance, the inmates, all wearing yellow prison scrubs, entered single file, wrists crossed at the small of their backs, walking into the light-gray, low-ceiling cinderblock room in the correction center’s basement. They talked while Sugarland’s “Settlin’” played in the background: “I ain’t settling for anything less than everything.” When the chairs ran out, the women crossed the hall, bringing back enough chairs to add three more rows.Then came the count – one, two, three, four – each woman sitting down after counting off, until the last woman called out, “92.” Then two more women scrambled in. A man radioed in the final count. Six women would miss the performance; some were on work duties, and others may have been sick, said Gary Tabor, the assistant warden.Throughout the performance, one could see the influence of poetry, from “all I know fits into a 100cc syringe” to Carol Ann Davis’s poem “All You Know” to “Town of my Return” by Allison Seay.Actors Chelsye Ginn, Jonny Schremmer, Laura Shatkus, Whitney Masters and Jocelyn Morelli during the inside performance of Stories from the Inside Out. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSThe 12 storytellers sat together during the reading. Sniffles from the storytellers, their fellow inmates, the correction center’s staff and guests, kept pace with the musical score. When it was over, the 94 women exited the room the same way they came in, single file, writs crossed at the small of their backs.Tabor praised the storytelling project for its positive impact on participants.In evaluation forms after the Nov. 14 program, some of the participants confirmed his assessment.“It helped me realize I’m a survivor,” said one woman.“It helped me get out some resentments that I have been harboring for years,” said another. “Writing is a great coping skill.”She would recommend the project to others, she continued, “because it will ask them to cope with the harsh realities that drove them to drugs and other addictions in the first place. So that maybe they will stay away from that lifestyle.”The story project fits with Warden Maggie Capel’s philosophy for the community correction center, which, unlike a tougher prison, focuses on making a difference in the inmates’ lives and helping them transition back into society.“They are all quite moved by it,” said Capel, of the inside reading. “It’s very eye-opening to them to hear their story told by a third party.”It also can be eye-opening for “outside” listeners.Portraits of the 12 storytellers taken by photographer Andrew Kilgore hung on the wall at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church during the outside performance and were set on wooden easels behind the actors during the inside performance. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSThe play bill distributed the following evening at St. Paul’s explained the event’s intent: Everyone has a story, and when people are given the opportunity to listen to the stories of others, we become less likely to dehumanize one another with stereotypes.This show was not as brutal as the last two; it’s more nuanced, said Erika Wilhite, the project’s theater director.“It’s maybe one of the best ones yet,” she said. “The biggest job is not to allow melodrama; if it’s too graphic, the audience will draw back.”The St. Paul’s performance had two objectives, McGregor said: to help people realize that under different circumstances the women’s stories could be their own and to show them that the journey that culminates in prison didn’t happen in a vacuum and that there are consequences to abuse. Click here to view the full performance, intended for mature audiences, at St. Paul’s.In the 1950s, when family was sacred and McGregor was growing up in Auburn, Alabama, abuse wasn’t discussed, she said. Today, it’s discussed but still happens.But the affected women don’t see themselves as victims, nor do they necessarily immediately see the connection between their childhood abuse and the decisions they made that led to their incarceration, McGregor said.In some ways, she said, the storytelling project is an “exploration” – “What did happen differently for me?”The November performances also provided an opportunity for reflection for actor Laura Shatkus, a Chicago native working on a master’s degree at the University of Arkansas. Looking at her childhood in comparison to the women’s, “had I made different decisions, or had different parents,” she said, their stories could have been hers.Transitioning from incarcerationWorking successively with three groups of inmates, McGregor and other volunteers involved in the project have identified a need beyond the storytelling.“We’ve fallen in love three times with 36 women, we become so close,” said McGregor. “Some of the women have come from very abusive situations and have nowhere to go but back to the abusive situation. We’ve lost some to meth and alcohol addiction.”So the next step in St. Paul’s prison ministry is to provide a transitional home where the women can live upon release from prison while they put their lives back together.To stress the need for a transitional home, McGregor shared the story of a former story project participant, a gifted songwriter, who succumbed to her addictions.In vivid, dry detail, the woman, who grew up without electricity and running water, recalled how it felt when her mother grabbed her hair with such force that her scalp separated from her skull; how hard it was to run and keep up with her siblings while wearing two left shoes; and the years of sexual abuse she endured by an older brother, until the day she cried and he stopped.The woman, in her 20s and with three children of her own, was paroled and returned to that same family environment and eventually returned to her drug addiction, McGregor told ENS during a sit-down interview at a coffee shop in Fayetteville.“That is why I want a halfway house,” said McGregor.It’s a subject that hits close to home.“I don’t know why I didn’t end up in prison,” said McGregor, a longtime storyteller, parish nurse and union organizer who now works as a hospice nurse at a nearby Veterans Administration Hospital. “I survived terrible abuse.”McGregor’s mother and stepfather both were abusive, while her biological father was absent, she said. It was through therapy that she “dug deep” into her own childhood, later becoming angry with her father and not speaking with him for a few years.“Where is the space to process when you come back to the same situation?” she asked.Northwest Arkansas Community Correction Center is located at the intersection of Spring Street and College Avenue in downtown Fayetteville. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSSt. Paul’s has included seed money for the transitional home in its 2014 stewardship campaign. In October, McGregor, Nichol and the Rev. Suzanne Stoner, a priest associate at St. Paul’s, attended the first national Thistle Farms Conference in Nashville, Tennessee, to network with others who work with similar populations of women and to learn how to operate a home.“This is not a transitional house, this is a moment in a movement,” said Stoner, who is a regular celebrant, along with the Rev. Lowell Grisham, with St. Paul’s rector, during a weekly Eucharist inside the correction center.The congregation’s response to the story project has been positive, said Grisham, though he said he’d been underwhelmed with its attendance at the performances.“There’s reluctance and intimidation when we are faced with something profound and terrible,” he said.To which Stoner added, “You have to be willing to have your eyes opened.”For parishioner Debbie Griffin, a licensed professional counselor who works at an alternative high school, the stories of the women are the stories of the teenagers she serves, many of whom are parents themselves.Part of her work, she said, is “undoing the damage and breaking the pattern that has been perpetrated on them by their family and circumstances.“It’s hard to overcome that,” she said. “They are victims of something bigger than themselves … abuse being the common thread.”“Essence,” 28, another storyteller, suffered physical and mental abuse at the hands of her mother, single and an alcoholic, and grew up in foster care. Taking part in the storytelling project helped her overcome a lot of issues, she said.“By sharing it and writing it down, I don’t have to live it anymore,” she said. “Every choice I made was based on my childhood.”A parole revocation brought Essence to the corrections center. She said she expected to be released in March, when she planned to reunite with her children, a 5-year-old son and a 9-year-old daughter, who currently live with her mother, who’s still drinking “but not as much,” in Mississippi. Essence will bring the children back to Arkansas.“It felt good, like an accomplishment,” said Essence following the inside reading. “I have the motivation to do what I’ve got to do now.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Barbi Click says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA By Lynette WilsonPosted Dec 5, 2013 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Prison storytelling project transforms lives, educates the community An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Job Listing Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments (4) Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Releasecenter_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY December 5, 2013 at 7:23 pm This is Jesus’ work! Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Jacquie Robertson says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC ashley gibson says: January 22, 2014 at 2:10 pm I am an ex resident of this program. I graduated it in march of 2011. Alot of the women there endured horrible lives. Most had drug addictions to help cope with the pain. No woman that I met there was a bad person. All were special in their own ways. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA December 5, 2013 at 10:04 pm I live in Tulsa, OK. We have a high rate of women prisoners also. I am interested in working with the women Veteran’s that are in prison here in OK. There are some new treatments for Veteran’s and their families that are free. Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) has a hyperbaric chamber for any veteran with post traumatic stress syndrome, brain injuries, wounds that do not heal, unbearable pain which leads to addictions to drugs. American Legion is suppose to be getting one as well as Disabled Veterans and one other. They will wind up having 4 of these here in Tulsa. I don’t know about those who are not veterans who are in prison, but hoping eventually it will be available for all. In the long run it will save money and the people treated are less likely to repeat what they did before, but as everyone knows there are exceptions to the rule. December 6, 2013 at 11:09 am This is beautiful work; God’s grace working through the community. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Sandra McCann says: Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Haiti Episcopal college prepares students for agriculture, agribusiness

first_img Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ February 23, 2016 at 7:50 am Couldn’t agree more to Ann’s post. Great project. Comments are closed. Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Haiti Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Haiti Episcopal college prepares students for agriculture, agribusiness Five-year plan looks to revitalize school, address food and economic security The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments (1) Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tim Myers says: Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Click here to read this story in French. [Episcopal News Service –Terrier-Rouge, Haiti] On a recent February morning a young Haitian man riding high on a John Deere tractor tilled the fields, readying them for the first planting of the year at the St. Barnabas Center for Agriculture, an Episcopal college located on 475 acres of fertile coastal plain in northern Haiti.As the tractor turned over the dark, clay soil, preparing it for planting, two young men worked to patch a crack in a cement water tank, two others pulled weeds from a carrot patch, and another two used blue and green plastic watering cans to hand-water beets, carrots and leafy greens growing in test plots and the seedlings coming to life in the greenhouse. Another young man drove cattle across the back of the property, while others continued to clear more land for the tractor and future planting.On a February day, a worker hand watered the seedlings in the greenhouse at the St. Barnabas Center for Agriculture in Terrier-Rouge, Haiti. Located in the country’s north on the coastal plain, the 475-acre school is 1.5 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceMeanwhile, students dressed in matching polo shirts with big block letters, “CASB” for the French “Centre D’Agriculture St. Barnabas,” written across the back, were studying in the classroom.The beginning signs of abundant life after a period of financial hardship and drought were everywhere; it was a $100,000 grant from the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island in 2014 that helped St. Barnabas begin its revitalization.“St. Barnabas was created in the name of God, and in the same name of God, St. Barnabas will be alive again,” said Etienne Saint-Ange, coordinator of field operations, in Creole through an interpreter.Etienne Saint-Ange, coordinator of field operations, talks with workers weeding carrots in the test plot, where plants are being tested for their viability. Everything grown at the school is grown organically. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceFor a decade the St. Barnabas Center for Agriculture operated without financial support, yet has continued in its mission to train agricultural technicians. Half the population works in agriculture, but a majority of Haitians lack food and 30 percent of all children suffer from malnutrition. It was Saint-Ange and other dedicated staff members that kept the school running, living off the produce grown in its fields.“The college leaders were the ones who kept it going from 2005-2014,” said Dan Tootle, an Episcopal Church Volunteer in Mission who serves as St. Barnabas’ program manager. In December 2015, faculty received seven months of back pay, a small amount of the $140,000 they are owed. “That’s not a show stopper because the people who were able to sustain this place now have a sense of hope,” said Tootle.Dan Tootle, an Episcopal Church Volunteer in Mission, has worked diligently on the St. Barnabas’ revitalization plan, which is intended to turn the agriculture college into a regional center for agriculture and economic development. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceTootle, 74, has served as a missionary to Haiti since 1999, when St. Martin’s-in-the-Field in Severna Park, Maryland, sponsored him. He became an Episcopal Church-appointed Volunteer in Mission in 2013, and has since focused on St. Barnabas, working on a five-year, $11.7 million revitalization plan that will modernize the college and transform it into a regional center for agriculture and economic development. It will also employ more than 180 people.“We took a hard look at the college to determine what it would take to revitalize this institution,” said Tootle, scrolling through the 35-page, comprehensive master plan, a scaled down version of the full 76-page study. “It was not just a matter of restoring it to what it was doing in the past, but moving it forward into what’s needed in the 21st century, beyond just the uses of traditional Haitian agriculture.”Ultimately, the college will be self-sustainable and able to provide assistance to other diocesan institutions.Now in its fifth iteration, including feedback from regional stakeholders and a full staff build out, the first 2.5-year phase includes construction of new academic facilities and preparing the land for proper drainage and access, as well as other foundational work. The second 1.5-year phase includes the infrastructure needed to raise and process animals, as well as establishing a regional agricultural support center. The third and final phase includes building a dormitory for 250 residential students, and the remaining administrative and support buildings. Other plans are to partner with FreshMinistries on aquaponics, establish orchards, and grow plants like sisal specifically to sell to processors.Teacher Georges Gabriel Etienne, who teaches botanics and vegetable crops, leads students on a lesson outside in the test plot. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceThe training that students receive at St. Barnabas is equivalent to that of students attending a community college in the United States, said Tootle, adding that it equips them to move directly into agribusiness and farming operations. As the curriculum evolves, he added, students will be encouraged toward entrepreneurship, and given the resources to help them along the way.Established as a partnership between the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti and the Presbyterian Church USA in 1984, St. Barnabas gained a nationwide reputation for educational excellence graduating some 30 classes over the years.“Young people from all over the country come here to be trained as agricultural technicians,” said Yves Mary Etienne, an economist and St. Barnabas graduate who joined the faculty in its early years and has stayed on.Yves Mary Etienne, an economist, pulls bok choy from the test plot and gives it to a woman from the community to sell at a local market. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service“St. Barnabas was created to further train farmers that couldn’t afford to go to school,”Etienne said in Creole through an interpreter, adding that students typically returned home, sharing what they’d learned for the benefit of the community. “St. Barnabas is not only for the north and the northeast, but educates students from around the country.”St. Barnabas’ graduates also developed a reputation for being well prepared.In Haiti, it’s important that job seekers have references, said Merlotte Pierre, who has served as St. Barnabas’ secretary and a French grammar teacher since 1997. A certificate from St. Barnabas often stands alone, she said, also in Creole through an interpreter.Merlotte Pierre teaches French grammar to students studying at the St. Barnabas Center for Agriculture. Pierre works as both the college’s secretary and a French teacher. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceFor students like Jonas Bien-Aimé, 22, who wants to become an agricultural expert, and Jouveline Pericles, 21, whose favorite subject is soil conservation and who someday would like to work for a nongovernmental organization, St. Barnabas provides the training, education and skills to move into such jobs. St. Barnabas’ students learn sustainable agricultural practices; all crops are grown organically, fertilized with compost rather than chemical fertilizers, and water and soil conservation are high priorities.St. Barnabas is one of two trade schools in the northern region of Haiti belonging to the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti – the other is Holy Spirit in Cap-Haïtien that trains students to works as plumbers, electricians and mechanics. Across the diocese, which has the most people in the Episcopal Church, education is a focus. The Diocese of Haiti operates more than 250 primary and secondary schools across Haiti that still is recovering from the magnitude-7 earthquake that devastated the country, killing hundreds of thousands and displacing more than 1.5 million people in 2010.Eliza Brinkley, a Young Adult Service Corps missionary from the Diocese of North Carolina, teaches English to students at the St. Barnabas Center for Agriculture. In addition to studying agriculture and agriculture techniques, students study English, French, economics and other general education topics.In the aftermath, governments and international relief agencies committed billions of dollars in aid to rebuild the Caribbean nation, long considered the poorest in the Western Hemisphere. More than five years later, many of the NGOs are gone and Haiti remains one of the poorest countries in the world. The Episcopal Church, though, has stayed the course and has committed to rebuilding the diocesan institutions destroyed near the earthquake’s epicenter near the capital, Port-au-Prince, in the south. The Episcopal Church’s Development Office has led the rebuilding effort.“Along with rebuilding Holy Trinity Cathedral and St. Vincent’s School for the Handicapped, St. Barnabas is a priority for the Development Office because its existence will strengthen and support the mission and ministry of the diocese,” said Tara Elgin Holley, director of development for the Episcopal Church. “Furthermore, the revitalization of the college and the 475 acres it sits on directly addresses the Fifth Mark of Mission, ‘to strive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earth.’ ”Despite having half the country’s 10 million people involved in farming, Haiti imports half its food, much of it from its neighbor, the Dominican Republic.“Growing hundreds of acres of crops that can be harvested and sold locally is an exciting prospect not just for the students of St. Barnabas, but for the region,” said Holley. “Teaching young people from all over Haiti to be agriculture technicians and small business owners will help create a brighter future for many. And the income from the sale of crops will allow the college to support its own operational budget and make its ongoing existence sustainable.”The momentum for St. Barnabas’ revitalization “had been present but dormant for some time,” said Tootle.The St. Barnabas Center for Agriculture is located on a major fault line. The school has built temporary classrooms and administrative buildings since the original building is vulnerable to collapse should a seismic event occur. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceIn 2014 two key things happened, he explained: The diocese’s Standing Committee took direct control of St. Barnabas’ revitalization, applying good governance principles. And the Diocese of Long Island gave St. Barnabas the $100,000 unrestricted gift, which has allowed the college to make immediate updates, including building temporary buildings, buying seeds and compost, performing maintenance on wells, and connecting St. Barnabas to the Caracol Village electrical grid.The gift from the Diocese of Long Island was part of a tithe, said Bishop Larry Provenzano.The diocese sold church property in downtown Brooklyn, and before investing the proceeds, made more than $2 million in grants to domestic and international ministries.“We have a large Haitian population in the diocese and we’d been hearing about the work in Haiti,” said Provenzano, adding that supporting St. Barnabas was an easy decision that also fit with the diocese’s commitment to an “ecological theology.”In addition to support from Long Island, St. Barnabas has received support from others, includingConsortium of Endowed Episcopal Parishes, the Diocese of New York and the Diocese of California. With the support of California Bishop Marc Andrus, Volunteer Missioner for Haiti Davidson Bidwell-Waite and his husband, Edwin Bidwell-Waite, have spearheaded efforts to raising money for scholarships, and in April will be sending a group of students to St. Barnabas to help with planting.In addition to support from Long Island, St. Barnabas has received support from others, including the and the Diocese of California, which in addition to providing financial support and raising money for scholarships, will in April send a group of students to St. Barnabas to help with planting.As St. Barnabas continues on its path to revitalization, the faculty and students are looking to create partnerships with individuals, parishes, and dioceses that are interested in environmental stewardship and sustainable development as well as gardening, farming, animal husbandry, and beekeeping, said Holley. “Partnerships are what will help St. Barnabas to grow and thrive … as both an educational institution and a regional resource center for agriculture technology.”For more information on how you, your parish or your diocese can get involved, click here.– Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service.    Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ By Lynette WilsonPosted Feb 22, 2016 last_img read more

Le Conseil exécutif de l’Église épiscopale réaffirme son soutien à…

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Le Conseil exécutif de l’Église épiscopale réaffirme son soutien à Standing Rock Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Executive Council, Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York de Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 8, 2017 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY center_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest L’Église épiscopale défend la Nation sioux au sujet de l’oléoduc de Dakota Access depuis l’été dernier. Les épiscopaliens locaux ont également assuré un ministère de présence à et aux environs de Cannon Ball (État du Dakota du Nord), point de ralliement des groupes de protecteurs de l’eau rassemblés près du franchissement proposé. L’étendard épiscopal y a constamment flotté jusqu’aux récentes initiatives de fermeture du campement en raison des dangereuses intempéries hivernales et de la crainte d’inondations catastrophiques au printemps. Photo : Page Facebook de John Floberg[Episcopal News Service] Le dernier jour de sa réunion du 5 au 8 février, le Conseil exécutif de l’Église épiscopale a réaffirmé son soutien à la Nation sioux de Standing Rock.Les membres du Conseil ont déclaré que l’église s’engage à « continuer à soutenir l’action et les leaders de la Nation sioux de Standing Rock qui est le sel et la lumière de la nation dans son soutien constant au caractère sacré de l’eau, de la terre et autres ressources et son rappel à tous de l’appel sacré à la fidélité ».Ils ont félicité l’Église épiscopale et ses partenaires œcuméniques dans les actions de protection de l’eau entreprises par la Nation sioux de Standing Rock. Le révérend John Floberg, membre du conseil et prêtre responsable des congrégations épiscopales de la partie de Standing Rock située dans le Dakota du Nord, a suscité les louanges spécifiques du conseil, tout comme « les centaines de laïcs et membres du clergé épiscopaux qui ont répondu à son appel ».Le Conseil a également appuyé l’appel de la Nation sioux de Standing Rock à une Marche le 10 mars sur Washington DC. La résolution indique que la marche a « pour objectif de proclamer notre préoccupation continue pour les eaux et les terres sacrées ainsi que de mettre notre gouvernement au défi de respecter toutes les obligations pertinentes des États-Unis découlant des traités avec toutes les tribus reconnues au niveau fédéral ». La tribu avait précédemment commencé à organiser la marche que John Floberg a invité les épiscopaliens à rejoindre.L’Église épiscopale a défendu la Nation sioux au sujet de l’oléoduc de Dakota Access depuis l’été 2016. Les épiscopaliens locaux ont également assuré un ministère de présence  à et aux environs de Cannon Ball (État du Dakota du Nord), point de ralliement des groupes de protecteurs de l’eau rassemblés près du franchissement proposé.Article complet en anglais. Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Albany, NY Standing Rock Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Indigenous Ministries, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Dakota Access Pipeline, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Executive Council February 2017, last_img read more