first_img Previous Article Next Article Acas to raise awareness of individual arbitration schemeOn 1 Dec 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. He said that Acas had not been able to relaunch the scheme yet because ithad been caught up in legal problems around its compatibility with Scottishlaw. Wareing defended the overall concept of the system and blamed a lack ofawareness for the low take-up among employers. “The concept is not flawed and it hasn’t been sold enough. Startingfrom scratch is always a long process. We need to raise awareness of the systembecause employers always fear a step into the unknown,” he said. He stressed that in the 41 cases that have taken place, user satisfactionwas very high and that its speed and confidentiality was still attractive toemployers. Cases dealt with by the system are not subject to public record and itsfindings are private, legally binding and not subject to appeal. CIPD employee relations expert Mike Emmott blamed an “inertia ofinterest” from employers and lawyers for its failure to catch on. Engineering Employers Federation head of legal affairs Peter Schofield saidthe scheme’s profile was too low and that lawyers were nervous because theywere unfamiliar with it. However, he said employers were still interested in the tribunal alternativebecause it of its confidentially. l Acas is hoping to relaunch its individual arbitration scheme after itattracted just 41 cases in its first three years of operation. The service, launched in 2000, was supposed to reduce the pressure on theEmployment Tribunal system by offering a faster, confidential and lesslegalistic alternative. However, the majority of people continue to go through the courts and thescheme has failed to attract employers or lawyers. Acas strategy director Andrew Wareing said he hoped the system would berelaunched across the UK once legal problems in Scotland were resolved. He said that Acas had not been able to relaunch the scheme yet because ithad been caught up in legal problems around its compatibility with Scottishlaw. Wareing defended the overall concept of the system and blamed a lack ofawareness for the low take-up among employers. “The concept is not flawed and it hasn’t been sold enough. Startingfrom scratch is always a long process. We need to raise awareness of the systembecause employers always fear a step into the unknown,” he said. He stressed that in the 41 cases that have taken place, user satisfactionwas very high and that its speed and confidentiality was still attractive toemployers. Cases dealt with by the system are not subject to public record and itsfindings are private, legally binding and not subject to appeal. CIPD employee relations expert Mike Emmott blamed an “inertia ofinterest” from employers and lawyers for its failure to catch on. Engineering Employers Federation head of legal affairs Peter Schofield saidthe scheme’s profile was too low and that lawyers were nervous because theywere unfamiliar with it. However, he said employers were still interested in the tribunal alternativebecause it of its confidentially. last_img

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